tgweaver:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks about Five Nights at Freddy’s lately, since I guess it reminds people of RubyQuest for some reason. Animal People + Horror is all it takes, I guess? And so now people want my thoughts on it. Now, I preface this by saying I haven’t played it, but I’ve seen it played mostly through.
My thoughts are as follows:FNAF seems like a flimsy excuse for a game. It’s a pile of cheap jump-scares and nonsensical mechanics built on top of what could barely be described as gameplay. The whole thing just feels like a jump scare video, but if you click the right button at the right time, there won’t be a jumpscare. Whee! Almost makes you forget you’re staring at a tablet the whole game.
Making you feel powerless or vulnerable is a huge aspect of good horror games. If you deck out the player with so much weaponry they can take down any horror that comes at them, it’s just an action game with a horror aesthetic. In Silent Hill, you get weapons, but they do so little against the monsters you never feel that badass or powerful, even when well-equipped. In Fatal Frame, your only defense is a camera, whose combat mechanics actually encourage you to put yourself in danger to do more damage.But I also feel that games which give you no way to fight back are going too far. Amnesia is arguably one of the best games of this sub-genre of “run and hide” games, perhaps because there were actual gameplay segments. But I don’t feel particularly engaged by that. I’d rather just watch a (commentary-free) playthrough of games like that online, since it feels more like a movie you occasionally have to hide during in order to keep the footage rolling. What I’m getting at is that FNAF does make you feel vulnerable, yes, but there’s no reward for that, no catharsis in overcoming it. You’re sticking someone in a black box and yelling “boo” from time to time.
The character designs, which I assume are what caught everyone’s attention in the first place, fall in the worst part of goofy-creepy. In a goofy Chuck E. Cheese-like setting, they’re too creepy to even make sense, and not in the genuine way real animatronics fit a sort of uncanny valley creepy niche (like the attached photo). But at the same time, in a creepy setting, like the game, they’re too goofy to actually be scary. They should have gone more one way or the other, because as it is, the only way they present any scariness is their sudden movements.
It doesn’t help that I’ve always resented the mewling, whimpering hordes of LPers that ham up their reactions and pretend to be SUPER SCARED OH MY GOD whenever a light flickers, putting on some exaggerated falsetto to watch those subscribers soar.
In the end, my dislike of the game is fairly mild. It’s only amplified by people hyping it up like it’s the rebirth of the horror genre, and by the insufferable LPers who are buying mansions off their “pretend to be scared” YouTube cash.
August 23 201408·07 pm114 notes

tgweaver:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks about Five Nights at Freddy’s lately, since I guess it reminds people of RubyQuest for some reason. Animal People + Horror is all it takes, I guess? And so now people want my thoughts on it. Now, I preface this by saying I haven’t played it, but I’ve seen it played mostly through.

My thoughts are as follows:
FNAF seems like a flimsy excuse for a game. It’s a pile of cheap jump-scares and nonsensical mechanics built on top of what could barely be described as gameplay. The whole thing just feels like a jump scare video, but if you click the right button at the right time, there won’t be a jumpscare. Whee! Almost makes you forget you’re staring at a tablet the whole game.

Making you feel powerless or vulnerable is a huge aspect of good horror games. If you deck out the player with so much weaponry they can take down any horror that comes at them, it’s just an action game with a horror aesthetic. In Silent Hill, you get weapons, but they do so little against the monsters you never feel that badass or powerful, even when well-equipped. In Fatal Frame, your only defense is a camera, whose combat mechanics actually encourage you to put yourself in danger to do more damage.
But I also feel that games which give you no way to fight back are going too far. Amnesia is arguably one of the best games of this sub-genre of “run and hide” games, perhaps because there were actual gameplay segments. But I don’t feel particularly engaged by that. I’d rather just watch a (commentary-free) playthrough of games like that online, since it feels more like a movie you occasionally have to hide during in order to keep the footage rolling.
What I’m getting at is that FNAF does make you feel vulnerable, yes, but there’s no reward for that, no catharsis in overcoming it. You’re sticking someone in a black box and yelling “boo” from time to time.

The character designs, which I assume are what caught everyone’s attention in the first place, fall in the worst part of goofy-creepy. In a goofy Chuck E. Cheese-like setting, they’re too creepy to even make sense, and not in the genuine way real animatronics fit a sort of uncanny valley creepy niche (like the attached photo). But at the same time, in a creepy setting, like the game, they’re too goofy to actually be scary. They should have gone more one way or the other, because as it is, the only way they present any scariness is their sudden movements.

It doesn’t help that I’ve always resented the mewling, whimpering hordes of LPers that ham up their reactions and pretend to be SUPER SCARED OH MY GOD whenever a light flickers, putting on some exaggerated falsetto to watch those subscribers soar.

In the end, my dislike of the game is fairly mild. It’s only amplified by people hyping it up like it’s the rebirth of the horror genre, and by the insufferable LPers who are buying mansions off their “pretend to be scared” YouTube cash.

sarangsandhie:

Hamsempai♥︎(੭ु ›ω‹ )੭ु⁾⁾♡
August 23 201407·33 pm16 notes

sarangsandhie:

Hamsempai♥︎(੭ु ›ω‹ )੭ु⁾⁾♡

(via troglodytespacebird)

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results
August 22 201409·47 pm328,400 notes

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

(Source: awwww-cute, via amalgamata)

August 22 201409·13 pm50,809 notes

onlylolgifs:

Bonobo builds a fire and toasts marshmallows

(via gifs-gifs-gifs-gifs-gifs)

August 22 201408·40 pm17,140 notes

sailorstoner:

bunkisu:

m-e-d-i-e-v-a-l-d-r-e-a-m-s:

Celtic houses

oh my god

all of my houses tbh

(via damnnlyssa)

beyoncebeytwice:

i love how no matter how badly you fuck up benadryl cumquat’s name everyone on here still knows who ur talking about

(via alienmovies)

August 21 201411·27 pm563 notes

albotas:

KICKSTART THIS SHIZZ: HOTLINE MIAMI 1/6 SCALE ARTICULATED JACKET FIGURE

Our longtime amigo Erick Scarecrow has teamed up with Dennaton Games and Devolver Digital for what could be his biggest release to date - a figure based on Jacket, the protagonist in the video game cult sensation Hotline Miami.

Making a leap from the urban designer vinyl toy scene, Erick Scarecrow shows that he’s more than capable of producing high-end licensed 1/6 scale figures on par with the likes of those produced by 3A or Hot Toys

The primary figure is 12” tall and comes with four removable heads: Tony (Tiger), Richard (Rooster), Aubrey (Pig), and a bloody, bandaged Jacket head. The figure also comes with interchangeable clothing including a letter jacket, t-shirt, pair of jeans, Air Vigilante sneakers and a hospital gown. Three weapons - a shotgun, baseball bat, and katana - are included for Jacket to hold as he is posed using the 15 points of articulation. 

The figure (prototype pictured above) still needs to reach its funding goal of $60,000, but due to the game’s huge fan following, there’s a pretty good change that the goal will be crushed.

Check out the official Hotline Miami - Jacket Figure Kickstarter page to check out all the cool backer tiers and incentives including all sorts of cool little goodies like Steam keys for Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number game & soundtrack, wallpapers, and a snazzy pin set. There’s also the ultra awesome “Midnight Miami Marauder” colorway limited to 1,000 pieces which is only available for backers at the $200 level.

I’ve been following Erick’s work and career for years, and this is an exciting next step. Can’t wait to see where he goes from here.